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California Has Received Millions for Prevention and Public Health

COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION GRANTS

In May, HHS announced $100M for up to 75 Community Transformation Grants (CTGs) as a part of ACA’s Prevention and Public Health Fund. The Fund, which will distribute $15B over 10 years, is aimed at focusing on wellness and prevention and preventing chronic disease. The CTG grants focus on 5 priority areas: 1) tobacco-free living; 2) active living and healthy eating; 3) evidence-based quality clinical and other preventive services; 4) social and emotional wellness; and 5) healthy and safe physical environments.

To date, the CDC has awarded $103M in Community Transformation Grants (CTGs) to 61 states/communities to serve approximately 120M Americans. Grantees included 29 large counties, 10 states, 14 states minus large counties, 7 tribes, and 1 territory (see below). Twenty-six grantees will create solid foundations for community prevention efforts with grants ranging from $147,000-$500,000. Thirty-five grantees will implement evidence-based programs to improve health and wellness with grants ranging from $500,000-$10M.

Ten grants were awarded to California entities, including seven counties, one foundation, one tribe, and the Public Health Institute (which will serve the entire state, minus large counties). Their award amounts, plans, and estimated population served according to the CDC are below ($22.3M total)

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is receiving $9,848,011 to serve the large county of Los Angeles, an estimated population of 10,400,000. Work will focus on expanding efforts in tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, social and emotional wellness, and healthy and safe physical environments.

The County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency is receiving $3,053,793 to serve the large county of San Diego, an estimated population of over 3,095,000. Work will focus on expanding efforts in tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, social and emotional wellness, and healthy and safe physical environments.

The San Francisco Department of Public Health is receiving $815,358 to serve the large county of San Francisco, an estimated population of 805,000. Work will focus on expanding efforts in tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, and healthy and safe physical environments.

The County of Kern’s Public Health Services Department is receiving a $416,577 planning award to build capacity to support healthy lifestyles in the large county of Kern (including the city of Bakersfield), an estimated population of over 839,000. Work will target tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, and healthy and safe physical environments.

The Fresno County Department of Public Health is receiving a $499,695 planning award to build capacity to support healthy lifestyles in the large county of Fresno, an estimated population of over 930,000. Work will target tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, and healthy and safe physical environments.

The Stanislaus County Health Services Agency is receiving a $293,899 planning award to build capacity to support healthy lifestyles in the large county of Stanislaus (including the city of Modesto), an estimated population of over 500,000. Work will target tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, and healthy and safe physical environments.

Ventura County Public Health is receiving a $481,036 planning award to build capacity to support healthy lifestyles in the large county of Ventura (including the city of Oxnard), an estimated population of 823,000. Work will target tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, social and emotional wellness, and healthy and safe physical environments.

The Toiyabe Indian Health Project is receiving a $500,000 planning award to build capacity to support healthy lifestyles among an estimated tribal population of 3,000 within the state of California. Work will target tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and preventive services, social and emotional wellness, and healthy and safe physical environments.

The Sierra Health Foundation is receiving a $499,229 planning award to build capacity to support healthy lifestyles in the large county of Sacramento, an estimated population of 1,400,000. Work will target tobacco-free living, active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, healthy and safe physical environments, and social and emotional wellness.

The Public Health Institute is receiving $5,926,365 to serve the state of California minus large counties, an estimated population of 5,900,000 including a rural population of over 833,000. Work will focus on expanding efforts in tobacco-free living; active living and healthy eating, quality clinical and other preventive services, and healthy and safe physical environments.

ADDITIONAL PREVENTION AND PUBLIC HEALTH GRANTS AWARDED TO CALIFORNIA

Since the passing of ACA, California has received an additional $42.7M from ACA’s Public Health and Prevention Fund.

Under the Community and Clinical Prevention categories, California received $3.6M for “Communities Putting Prevention to Work,” $2M for primary and behavioral health integration, $3.2M for HIV prevention, and $250,000 for tobacco cessation ($9M total).

Under Public Health Infrastructure, California received $4M for public health infrastructure (IT, workforce training and policy), $1.3M for epidemiology and laboratory capacity, and $1.9M for public health training centers ($7.2M total).

California also received funding for Primary Care Training, including $150,000 for state health care workforce development, $18M for a primary care residency expansion program, $1.1M for an advanced nursing education expansion program, $4.1M for expansion of physician assistant training, and $3M for nurse-managed health clinics ($26M total).

For a comprehensive overview of ACA’s investment in public health and prevention, I recommend the report Adam Dougherty and I published last year, “Primary Care and Prevention: Changes Under Federal Health Reform.”

 

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